Engedi

Ein Gedi National Park

After swimming in the Dead Sea it was already very hot, so the kids went back to their airconditioned rooms, while Ida and I went in our airconditioned car to the Ein Gedi kibbutz for some work. Ida really had to the laundry, I had to upload photos.

We were back quite late, perhaps 2pm or so and had lunch using the lunch provided by the Youth Hostel. Came with our take away yesterday evening, very useful. After we went to Ein Gedi National Park. It's basically a small valley between scorching rocks, with water supplied through underground channels from the Western side of the Judean desert. This creates a unique climate. There are waterfalls everywhere. The following photo shows the waterfalls, not the true depth unfortunately. But I reallly suggest you click on the picture and zoom in (zoom button in the bottom right corner) to see it in its full glory.

The park was home to some unique animals. Here the hyrax.

Their colour is very well adapted to the background:

The same for the ibexes (wild mountain goats). We could seem them trekking high up the hills, going up impossibly steep ascents.

But the big attraction are the springs and pools of course. You just can't believe how refreshing it is to get in one of those pools after having walked through possibly 55℃ in the burning sun.

So that's basically what we did: we went from pool to pool. The kids enjoyed themselves immensely.

There was even a natural slide in one of the pools.

The pool the kids liked most was the one where they could climb up and jump down.

Just before closing time we reached the last and largest spring, the David spring.

To Ein Gedi

After Timna National Park we continued our journey towards the Dead Sea, and specifically Ein Gedi. Ein Gedi is known as Engedi in the King James. David lived in this area when he fled for Saul. At the south tip of the Dead Sea we could already clearly see an important industry here.

Somewhere from a top, towards the North East:

The water is really blue here.

And then we arrived at our apartment. Luckily we could get dinner at the hotel, there is basically nothing else here, no villages, no restaurants, no shopping.

And without air conditioning we couldn't survive here. At night it's still hot, probably still 36℃ or so.

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